Category: SDG15 -Ecosystems and biodiversity

Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist and currently interim head of communications global. In his role as regional communications specialist, as well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the four countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization. As interim head of communications, Rob manages communications staff in Latin America, Africa and Asia and is overseeing implementation of ICRAF's Global Communications Group restructure.

Farmers in Southeast Asia are highly vulnerable to climate change. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

The role of agroforestry in climate-change adaptation in Southeast Asia

The ten countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations are highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Experts argue that agroforestry can help make the region’s millions of smallholding farmers more resilient and secure food supply....

pioneers-smothering-other-regrowth-copy

Research cuts a potential new path to faster, cheaper tropical forest restoration: Thinning

A common way to restore a degraded forest is to plant seedlings and nurture these into full trees. Indeed, to most people restoration and tree-planting (with native species) are virtually synonymous. Planting and nurturing tree seedlings over a...

Agroforestry has a long history in Myanmar but capacity of farmers and government agencies needs building in order to maximise potential. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

A new hope for agroforestry in Myanmar

The Government of Myanmar is enthusiastic about the role of agroforestry in the future of the newly-democratic nation   Myanmar (formerly Burma) is a newly democratic country. Centuries before, this country was rich in culture, natural resources and...

Wild honey bees (Apis florea) in Yunnan, southwest China. Photo by Jonathan Teichroew

Save China’s wild bees to safeguard global food supply: New study calls for more trees and fewer chemicals on China’s farms

China has so far avoided the massive losses of bees seen in the West, but the country’s diverse range of native bees face their own set of growing threats. The authors of a new study, titled “Is China’s...

The banyan tree, Ficus benghalensis in Hawaii. Photo ©Mike Shanahan

Fig trees throw down a lifeline to a healthier planet

Fig trees were here when dinosaurs first roamed the planet. And today, just as they did 80 million years ago, Ficus species continue to bring nourishment, shade, water and numerous other gifts to people and plants. What’s more,...

Alex Oduor and Malesu Maimbo, water engineers from the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), talk with Khat farmers in Embu. Khat cultivation is severely impacting water availability yet is lucrative for farmers. Photo D Odhiambo/ICRAF

Resolving the khat conundrum: when a profitable crop has downsides

With European markets closed to the khat grown in one Kenyan county, khat grown in another county is making inroads into coffee, tea and forest. Environmental damage is escalating. Fortunately, researchers from the World Agroforestry Centre have a...