Category: SDG13-Climate change

Cathy Watson

Cathy Watson

Cathy Watson is chief of programme development at the World Agroforestry Centre in Nairobi. Before joining ICRAF in November 2012, she founded and ran two NGOs in Uganda -- Straight Talk Foundation and Mvule Trust. She was made a senior Ashoka fellow for social entrepreneurship in 2006. She has also been a foreign correspondent, working for The Guardian and the BBC, among others. A graduate in biology and Latin American Studies from Princeton, she has almost 30 years of work experience in Africa with a focus on trees, youth, HIV, families, and communication for social change. She holds a certificate in agroforestry from the University of Missouri.

Moringa-based agroforestry in Konso, southern Ethiopia is a traditional soil conservation and tree planting practice that can be drawn on for landscape restoration. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/A Gebrekirstos

Reaching the ‘how’ of landscape restoration: experts from ICRAF, IUCN discuss in Paris

As climate negotiators wrangled in Paris towards the historic agreement this December, scientists and policy makers elsewhere in the city were equally fixated on landscapes and how to restore them. Landscape restoration locks up carbon in the soil...

Grafting cocoa trees for higher production in Soubre, Cote d'Ivoire, under the Mars-sponsored Vision for Change Project. Photo By Claude Adjehi/ICRAF

Private companies partner with small producers to create sustainable supply chains of the future

Leveraging their buying power and financial resources, companies are working to create the sustainable supply chains we need in a changing climate. Ones in which farmers and companies prosper together. Where farmers will produce more using ecologically sound...

Part of ICRAF's tree domestication and experimentation nursery in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Photo by Daisy Ouya/ICRAF

With trees on farms, climate-change mitigation is a co-benefit of broader socioeconomic gains

In a ‘Letter to the Editor’ published in the Guardian Development Blog, Professor Roger Leakey urges a closer look at agroforestry’s potential as a pathway for both mitigating climate change and fighting hunger, malnutrition and poverty. Leakey, who...

'Alone', a photo by Yudha Lesmana, was finalist in the XIV World Forestry Congress photo competition. http://bit.ly/1OjlqSp

Rainfall: a new way to look at trees for climate mitigation

A side event at the UN climate change conference now underway in Paris (COP21) urged a new, easier-to-understand way to discuss trees and climate change mitigation: Rainfall. Rainfall made through evapotranspiration from plant matter cools the air around,...

Agroforestry in Kenya delivers food and woodfuel for households. Photo by Daisy Ouya/ICRAF

To Paris COP21 with an agroforestry message

Our changing climate and burgeoning population urgently needs agricultural techniques that can produce more on less land and with fewer inputs, while keeping the environment healthy. As such, sustainable agriculture that brings climate adaptation and mitigation benefits is...

Mr. Duong Van Tham (rightmost participant) and women interested in earthworms. Even the women and elderly could tend to the worms, making it an inclusive practice. Photo: ICRAF/Le Van Hai

Farming worms for climate-smart agriculture in Vietnam

Twenty-three farmers from My Loi village in Viet Nam were recently trained in vermiculture—raising worms on farms to produce fertilizer and improve soil. Vermicomposting will help the farmers improve one of their priority ‘climate-smart agriculture’ interventions—home gardens. Inspired...