Category: SDG05-Gender equality and women’s empowerment

Susan Onyango

Susan Onyango

Susan Onyango is the communications specialist for climate change for the World Agroforestry Centre and is based at the headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya. With over 12 year’s experience in communication, she promotes the World Agroforestry Centre’s work on climate change, writes blogs and provides communication advice and support to scientists. Susan holds a MA communication studies and a BA in English. Twitter: @susanonyango

Dr. Catherine Dembele of the World Agroforestry Centre in West Africa. Photo/Susan Onyango

International Women’s Day 2017: Women in the Changing World of Work

International Women’s Day is observed on March 8 every year to celebrate women’s achievements throughout history and across nations. For more than 100 years, countries around the world have observed this day in various ways in recognition of...

A woman works on a pepper nursery in Southeast Sulawesi. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/ Yusuf Ahmad

Gender in agriculture: creating opportunities for women

By the year 2050, the world’s population is expected to grow to 9 billion. To meet this increasing demand for food, agricultural productivity must be sustainably improved. The Sustainable Development Goal no. 2 on agriculture, food security and nutrition demonstrates...

Pham Van Ky pointing out flood damage in My Loi after two periods of heavy rain. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Le Thi Tam

The last drop is what makes the cup run over

  Floods hit Central Viet Nam: what can we learn? Researchers in the climate-smart village program are working with farmers to protect them and their farms from extreme weather.   By Le Thi Tam and Elisabeth Simelton  ...

Farmers in Southeast Asia are highly vulnerable to climate change. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

The role of agroforestry in climate-change adaptation in Southeast Asia

The ten countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations are highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Experts argue that agroforestry can help make the region’s millions of smallholding farmers more resilient and secure food supply....

Agroforestry has a long history in Myanmar but capacity of farmers and government agencies needs building in order to maximise potential. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

A new hope for agroforestry in Myanmar

The Government of Myanmar is enthusiastic about the role of agroforestry in the future of the newly-democratic nation   Myanmar (formerly Burma) is a newly democratic country. Centuries before, this country was rich in culture, natural resources and...

Alex Oduor and Malesu Maimbo, water engineers from the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), talk with Khat farmers in Embu. Khat cultivation is severely impacting water availability yet is lucrative for farmers. Photo D Odhiambo/ICRAF

Resolving the khat conundrum: when a profitable crop has downsides

With European markets closed to the khat grown in one Kenyan county, khat grown in another county is making inroads into coffee, tea and forest. Environmental damage is escalating. Fortunately, researchers from the World Agroforestry Centre have a...