Category: SD5-Environmental Services

Sacha Amaruzaman

Sacha Amaruzaman

Sacha Amaruzaman is an ecosystem services specialist with the World Agroforestry Centre Southeast Asia. He co-manages the Climate-Smart, Tree-Based, Adaptation and Mitigation in Asia (Smart Tree-Invest) project that is operating in Indonesia, Viet Nam and the Philippines. He also carries out research under the CGIAR Research Program on Forest, Trees and Agroforestry, mainly focusing on ecosystem services, socioeconomic and institutional aspects.

Farmers used a game to help select the trees they wanted the most. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Dienda Citasyari Putri Hendrawan

Growing hope with trees: farmers’ learning groups in Buol, Indonesia

Farmers in the district of Buol in Central Sulawesi Province have formed learning groups to better understand tree management to improve their livelihoods in the face of climate change.   By Dienda Citasyari Putri Hendrawan   ‘We don’t...

Nypa is a promising bioenergy plant that deserves further research. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

Bioenergy can bring clean power to remote areas of Indonesia

Areas of the archipelagic nation are under-serviced by public energy suppliers. Tree-based bioenergy offers the chance to not only provide power but also a source of livelihoods to these remote communities that is also environmentally friendly.   The...

The Government of Indonesia has ambitious plans to expand production of bioenergy crops. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

Indonesia set to expand use of bioenergy

The need for clearer policies, more trees and other plants for biomass and fuel, and use of organic waste from agriculture were some of the topics discussed at an international clean-energy forum for Indonesia that quickened the agenda...

edited

Power in balance: encouraging news about gender from Southern Sulawesi

Researchers in Sulawesi, Indonesia are sounding a rare note of optimism in the usually dreary accounting of gender relations: women’s situations aren’t so bad in communities they studied in southern Sulawesi.   According to the researchers, although men...

bee-coffee

For more and better-quality food production, take care of pollinators

The evidence is clear: For big gains in crop production, our landscapes must become more hospitable to some of the planet’s littlest creatures— its pollinators. Bees, birds, butterflies, moths and some small mammals transfer pollen from flower to...