Category: SD5-Environmental Services

Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist and currently interim head of communications global. In his role as regional communications specialist, as well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the four countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization. As interim head of communications, Rob manages communications staff in Latin America, Africa and Asia and is overseeing implementation of ICRAF's Global Communications Group restructure.

REDD+, equity, publications

Equity and REDD+: are we there yet?

The global scheme to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from deforestation and degradation plus conservation needs equitable distribution of both costs and benefits if it is to achieve its goals   Reducing greenhouse-gas emissions—and hence limiting global warming—by slowing or...

Buol, villagers, landscape

Can poor villages improve their livelihoods and protect their environment?

A new law in Indonesia gives funds for development but villages don’t have the capacity to carry it through. A workshop identified rewards-for-environmental-services’ schemes as potential capacity builders   The Government of Indonesia’s recently promulgated Law no. 6/2014...

researchers, systematic review of long-fallow swidden systems in Southeast Asia, SEARCA, seminar

‘Is it good or bad?’ Challenging views about swidden agriculture

Swidden agriculture is often viewed as a highly destructive practice. However, researchers have found that swidden may offer benefits to both resource-poor farmers and the global community.     Part 3 of the changing story of swidden. Read...

Dr Rob Cramb, SEARCA, Agriculture and Development Seminar

The past, present and future of swidden agriculture

Swidden practices have often been viewed as highly destructive and only used by poor, upland farmers. However, that perception is changing as the practice itself changes.   Part 2 of the changing story of swidden agriculture. Read parts...

oil palm, seedlings, Sulawesi, Photo Nichola Mitakda

Indonesian agriculture isn’t as ‘green’ as planned

Indonesia’s agricultural policies aim to reduce the environmental footprint but actions are incomplete, creating a gap between aspirations and reality   Indonesia has embraced sustainable agriculture through a variety of national strategies, such as National Agenda 21, national...

agroforestry trial, Northwest Viet Nam

Agroforests set to replace monocrops in Northwest Viet Nam

Land degradation owing to monocropping is the main reason for reduced agricultural productivity in Northwest Viet Nam. But after four years of agroforestry research, results show positive signs for farmers.   Monocropping of annuals—such as maize, rice and...