Category: SD4-Land health decisions

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya is a science writer and communications specialist with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Over the past 15 years she has been packaging and disseminating scientific knowledge in the fields of entomology, agriculture, health, HIV/AIDS research, and marine science. Daisy is a Board-certified Editor in the Life Sciences (bels.org) and has a Masters’ degree in chemistry from the University of Connecticut, USA. Her BSc is from the University of Nairobi in her native Kenya. She has worked as a journal editor, science writer, publisher, and communications strategist with various organizations. She joined ICRAF in July 2012. Twitter: @daisyouya

Aisha Karanja and Wanjira Mathai of the Green Belt Movement plant a tree at the ICRAF Campus, 4 March, 2015. Photo by D. Odhiambo/ICRAF

Empower Women for a Sustainable Africa: 2015 Africa Environment Day/ Wangari Maathai Day

“You do not need a diploma to plant a tree.” This was Professor Wangari Maathai’s smart response to people who were questioning her decision to train illiterate rural women on how to grow and nurture trees. To celebrate...

Selling firewood in Malawi: This is one way farmers cope with crop failure. Photo: ICRAF

Just coping: Farmers’ responses to climate variability in Malawi

The recent devastating floods in southern Malawi and surrounding areas brought into sharp focus the reality of climate change and its effects on ordinary people in this landlocked southern African country. Besides floods, delayed rains and droughts have...

learning landscapes, Asia, RUPES

Learning how landscapes work for better livelihoods and ecosystems

The CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry in collaboration with the World Agroforestry Centre and the RUPES project has been maintaining ‘learning landscapes’ for over a decade to discover ways of helping poor smallholders’ improve their...

Farmer with bush mango grown on the boundary of  rubber farm. Photo by Julius Atia/ICRAF

Rabbits and giant snails among rubber trees: Agroforestry rekindles rubber farming in Nigeria

Nigerian rubber farmers are finding that diversifying their land with food crops, food trees and ‘small livestock’ like rabbits, bees and snails makes sense on many levels. The mixed farm brings in food to eat and income long...