Category: SD2-Markets, value chains and institutions

Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist and currently interim head of communications global. In his role as regional communications specialist, as well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the four countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization. As interim head of communications, Rob manages communications staff in Latin America, Africa and Asia and is overseeing implementation of ICRAF's Global Communications Group restructure.

Smallholders are important suppliers of biofuel products in Indonesia. Photo World Agroforestry Centre/Noviana Khususiyah

Bioenergy for Indonesia means improving smallholders’ livelihoods and maintaining the environment

If Indonesia is to achieve its target of 23% renewable energy, of which 10% should come from bioenergy, by 2025, the nation must simultaneously improve policies, embrace smallholders to improve their livelihoods and maintain the services provided by...

The path to sustainable and productive oil palm might be lined with other crops. In Indonesia, the World Agroforestry Centre has been working with farmers and government to test intercropping of the latex-producing 'jelutung' tree on peat. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

‘Livelihoods insetting’ attracts oil-palm players

The idea of creating multiple agricultural alternatives for farmers within oil-palm landscapes has attracted interest from large industry players at a conference in Malaysia, the world’s second-biggest producing nation.   Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is one of the...

Cotton threads naturally dyed using indigo, turmeric and 'mengkudu' (Morinda citrifelia). Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Aulia Perdana

Improving timber and non-timber products in Indonesia

Understanding how to manage timber and non-timber forest products is particularly important for poorer households in Indonesia. Action research to improve farmers’ understanding is underway.   Combining tree planting with management of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) has been...

The land use in the district is typical rural landscape mosaic in Central Viet Nam: farmers cultivate home gardens in the vicinity of settlements; paddy rice and annual crops, mostly maize, peanuts and beans, are grown along riverbanks; planted forests, such as acacia plantations, are on more distant, higher, sloping areas. The most distant plots from settlements are the hilly, naturally-regenerating forests. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Rachmat Mulia.

Why are Vietnamese farmers not planting trees amid annual crops?

Size of landholding, flooding, and a shortage of knowledge, seedlings and markets are holding back farmers in Viet Nam from planting trees amongst their other crops. Researchers have found ways of overcoming these obstacles.   By Rachmat Mulia...

Industrial wood fuel. Photo courtesy of Dr. Henry Neufeldt/ICRAF

‘De-risk’ the wood energy sector to unleash green growth

With population growth and urbanization, the demand for energy from trees is growing rapidly around the world. This demand presents a golden opportunity for wood energy be a force for energy security, sustainable development and greener economies. But...

Burning charcoal in Mozambique. It takes 8-10 tonnes of wood to make a tonne of charcoal with this setup. Modern kilns are more efficient, at around 3.5 : 1 ratio of wood to charcoal. Photo: Valter Ziantoni/ICRAF - See more at: blog.worldagroforestry.org/index.php/2013/10/03/unpacking...

Brushing up charcoal’s image

You cannot handle charcoal without getting your hands dirty. Similarly, the charcoal value chain in sub-Saharan Africa, a multi-million dollar enterprise, has all the makings of a dirty business. In many countries, powerful cartels control the trade in...