Category: SD1-Systems Science

Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist and currently interim head of communications global. In his role as regional communications specialist, as well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the four countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization. As interim head of communications, Rob manages communications staff in Latin America, Africa and Asia and is overseeing implementation of ICRAF's Global Communications Group restructure.

Farmers in Southeast Asia are highly vulnerable to climate change. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

The role of agroforestry in climate-change adaptation in Southeast Asia

The ten countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations are highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Experts argue that agroforestry can help make the region’s millions of smallholding farmers more resilient and secure food supply....

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Fresh water, the reward of land restoration, flows in Ethiopia’s dry zone

Success stories of how land restoration has transformed landscapes and livelihoods in four watersheds of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia Fresh water — its availability or lack thereof— is a powerful signal of the health of an ecosystem. On a...

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Research cuts a potential new path to faster, cheaper tropical forest restoration: Thinning

A common way to restore a degraded forest is to plant seedlings and nurture these into full trees. Indeed, to most people restoration and tree-planting (with native species) are virtually synonymous. Planting and nurturing tree seedlings over a...

Alex Oduor and Malesu Maimbo, water engineers from the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), talk with Khat farmers in Embu. Khat cultivation is severely impacting water availability yet is lucrative for farmers. Photo D Odhiambo/ICRAF

Resolving the khat conundrum: when a profitable crop has downsides

With European markets closed to the khat grown in one Kenyan county, khat grown in another county is making inroads into coffee, tea and forest. Environmental damage is escalating. Fortunately, researchers from the World Agroforestry Centre have a...

Farmers practising social forestry in ASEAN come from a wide range of ethnicities and are among the poorest in their nations. Photo: Center for International Forestry Research

Seeing swidden

Swidden aka shifting cultivation has long been criticised as an unsustainable agricultural practice in Southeast Asia. Research is revealing its complexities and benefits   Swiddening, that is, the practice of clearing forest for annual crops and then managing...

Practising pruning a cocoa tree. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Hendra Gunawan

Kolaka Timur District moves to adopt agroforestry

A district government in Southeast Sulawesi Province, Indonesia plans to integrate agroforestry and associated methodologies into its medium-term development plan.   The Government of Kolaka Timur District in Southeast Sulawesi Province has embraced sustainable agriculture and agroforestry for...