Category: Tanzania

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya is a science writer and communications specialist with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Over the past 15 years she has been packaging and disseminating scientific knowledge in the fields of entomology, agriculture, health, HIV/AIDS research, and marine science. Daisy is a Board-certified Editor in the Life Sciences (bels.org) and has a Masters’ degree in chemistry from the University of Connecticut, USA. Her BSc is from the University of Nairobi in her native Kenya. She has worked as a journal editor, science writer, publisher, and communications strategist with various organizations. She joined ICRAF in July 2012. Twitter: @daisyouya

Dr Kimutai Maritim (Centre) with (L-R) book Editor Ian Dawson, authors Beatrice Tuei, Ramni Jamnadass and Ermias Aynekulu

Two books launched at ICRAF Science Week 2016

Two books — one on traditional plant-based medicine for livestock, and another on greenhouse gas measurements— were officially launched at ICRAF Science Week 2016, 5–9 September. Kimutai Maritim, the Assistant Director of Veterinary Services in Kenya, was the...

Sprinkler irrigation-in Ghana. Photo by Nana Kofi-Acquah/IWMI

Success factors for land and water management in Africa

At present, large expanses of land in rural Africa are degraded as a result of over extraction of trees for timber, firewood and charcoal. The problem is exacerbated by poor crop and animal husbandry practices, such as growing...

bee-coffee

For more and better-quality food production, take care of pollinators

The evidence is clear: For big gains in crop production, our landscapes must become more hospitable to some of the planet’s littlest creatures— its pollinators. Bees, birds, butterflies, moths and some small mammals transfer pollen from flower to...

Winnie Saigodi has planted Gliricidia sepium and Grevillea robusta trees as shelter belts in her farm (Photo credit: IITA/Jonathan Odhong’)

Multipurpose trees help Tanzania smallholders build a resilient farming system

Winnie Saigodi, a mother of five, from Moleti village in Kongwa District, Tanzania, had long given up on ever harvesting any meaningful produce from her one acre farm. ‘I completely lost hope because for five years, I hardly harvested...

Field testing of the new vegetationmap4Africa App. Photo by Roeland Kindt/ICRAF

The right tree for the right place: vegetationmap4africa v2 includes smartphone app

Tree enthusiasts on the move can now identify species as they go, and at the same time gain a deeper understanding of their natural environment, thanks to a new version of vegetationmap4africa (www.vegetationmap4africa.org). The new version of the...