G.Koech@cgiar.org'

Grace Koech

Grace Koech is an assistant researcher at World Agroforestry’s Eastern and Southern Africa Region. She has extensive experience in research, projects implementation, project management, biodiversity management and value chain development. She is also an effective communicator, able to generate targeted communication materials. She holds a Master of Science degree in biological science and Bachelor of Science degree in Biotechnology.

Benefits from trees regreen land and livelihoods

Smallholders in Ethiopia are set to benefit from development of tree value-chains. Wood-fuel, round wood, livestock fodder, honey and medicinal plants obtained from tree resources contributed up to 12.9% of Ethiopia’s GDP in 2012 (UNEP 2016). Millions of...

Fixing forests: how Decision Analysis is working on the ground in East Africa

Originally published by the CGIAR Research Programme on Water, Land and Ecosystems Among East Africa’s biodiversity hotspots is the Desa’a forest, which borders Tigray and Afar in Northern Ethiopia. The forest has become a priority area for conservation,...

Restoring drylands and empowering farmers: lessons from the Drylands Development Programme

  Successful land restoration needs human capacity, innovative technologies and mass participation. The countries of the Sahel Region of West Africa are vulnerable to the impact of large-scale environmental and land degradation, poor soil infertility, climate change, population...

Free community labour: critical to Ethiopia’s drive to restore land and improve livelihoods

  Farmers and pastoralists have contributed countless hours of labour across Ethiopia’s vast and varied landscapes through an under-recognized program   By Emily Sigman*   Farmers and pastoralists in Ethiopia have provided huge amounts of time and labour,...

GEF-funded program on resilient food security targets smallholder farmers in 12 African countries

Africa’s population is expected to double from 1.26 billion today to over two and half billion by 2050, little more than 30 years from now. At the same time, land degradation, loss of biodiversity and the effects of...

‘Tis the season for frankincense, a suitable restoration tree for the Horn of Africa

There’s one more reason to be jolly this season: the frankincense tree—source of one of the precious gifts of the Magi in the Christmas story—is being called “a suitable tree species for use in dryland restoration under a...

Put Soils First, African Soil Seminar concludes

For three days, the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) was abuzz with stakeholders concerned about the state and fate of Africa’s soils. Over 150 government, UN and NGO officials, researchers, agricultural technology providers and human rights advocates were attending...

Fresh water, the reward of land restoration, flows in Ethiopia’s dry zone

Success stories of how land restoration has transformed landscapes and livelihoods in four watersheds of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia Fresh water — its availability or lack thereof— is a powerful signal of the health of an ecosystem. On a...

What will it take to restore 100 million hectares of land in Africa?

Never before in the history of mankind have we been challenged to shape our own survival —Wanjira Mathai The challenge is massive, but so is the promise. Healing 100 million hectares of degraded and deforested land in Africa...

Two books launched at ICRAF Science Week 2016

Two books — one on traditional plant-based medicine for livestock, and another on greenhouse gas measurements— were officially launched at ICRAF Science Week 2016, 5–9 September. Kimutai Maritim, the Assistant Director of Veterinary Services in Kenya, was the...

What makes a farmer grow a tree? It depends.

Is it enough to recommend tree species to farmers? Or even to supply them with the right seedlings and advice on growing them? Across Africa bold campaigns, such as the African Forest Landscape Restoration Initiative (AFR100), are underway to...