Category: Philippines

Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist. As well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization.

Forest fashion, food and music wows Congress delegates: a photostory

Demonstrating that forests are more than then the sum of their trees, indigenous forest-dwellers showcased high-end fashion, food and orchestral prowess to the delight and edification of World Forestry Congress delegates. A story told in pictures…    ...

Model shows human impact on threatened tree species and their adaptability to climate change

Potential distribution of endangered forest tree species in the Philippines is largely determined by anthropogenic variables, that is, human activity. These species also respond differently to climate change: some might benefit while others lose habitat.   Alfie Torres,...

tree planting, Philippines

Reforestation is more than carbon

A team of researchers are advocating ‘climate-smart reforestation’: reforestation for climate-change mitigation and adaptation that takes into account the impacts of climate change on the reforestation itself.   Researchers from different universities and institutions discuss in a recently...

researchers, systematic review of long-fallow swidden systems in Southeast Asia, SEARCA, seminar

‘Is it good or bad?’ Challenging views about swidden agriculture

Swidden agriculture is often viewed as a highly destructive practice. However, researchers have found that swidden may offer benefits to both resource-poor farmers and the global community.     Part 3 of the changing story of swidden. Read...

Dr Rob Cramb, SEARCA, Agriculture and Development Seminar

The past, present and future of swidden agriculture

Swidden practices have often been viewed as highly destructive and only used by poor, upland farmers. However, that perception is changing as the practice itself changes.   Part 2 of the changing story of swidden agriculture. Read parts...

oil palm, seedlings, Sulawesi, Photo Nichola Mitakda

Indonesian agriculture isn’t as ‘green’ as planned

Indonesia’s agricultural policies aim to reduce the environmental footprint but actions are incomplete, creating a gap between aspirations and reality   Indonesia has embraced sustainable agriculture through a variety of national strategies, such as National Agenda 21, national...