s.onyango@cgiar.org'

Susan Onyango

Susan Onyango is the Global Communications Coordinator at the World Agroforestry Centre and is based at the headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya. With over 15 year’s experience in communication, she ensures efficient and effective coordination of communication support to units and regions at ICRAF. She joined ICRAF in 2014 as communications specialist for the Climate Change Unit. Susan holds a MA communication studies and a BA in English. Twitter: @susanonyango

Connecting the dots between forests, water and climate

More than 500 people from around the world tuned in on 21 and 22 March 2017 to Cool Insights for a Hot World, a virtual symposium to engage with scientists in a discussion about the links between forests,...

Why pay for a weather forecast if it’s free online?

Did you check the weather forecast for today? Did you do it on your phone? In Viet Nam, over 95% of farmers in Dien Bien and Ha Tinh provinces watch weather forecasts on TV. However, these forecasts are...

Cool insights for a hot world: trees and forests recycle water

Anyone who has walked outside on a sunny day knows that forests and trees matter for temperature, humidity and wind speed. Planting trees speaks to concerns about climate change, but the directly important aspects of the tree-climate relationships...

Resilient productivity: growing enough safe food for a rising population in Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa has huge potential for food production, but factors including land degradation and unreliable rainfall mean that this potential remains largely underused. There is still a large gap between actual and potential annual yields, resulting in recurrent...

The banyan tree, Ficus benghalensis in Hawaii. Photo ©Mike Shanahan

Fig trees throw down a lifeline to a healthier planet

Fig trees were here when dinosaurs first roamed the planet. And today, just as they did 80 million years ago, Ficus species continue to bring nourishment, shade, water and numerous other gifts to people and plants. What’s more,...

Alex Oduor and Malesu Maimbo, water engineers from the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), talk with Khat farmers in Embu. Khat cultivation is severely impacting water availability yet is lucrative for farmers. Photo D Odhiambo/ICRAF

Resolving the khat conundrum: when a profitable crop has downsides

With European markets closed to the khat grown in one Kenyan county, khat grown in another county is making inroads into coffee, tea and forest. Environmental damage is escalating. Fortunately, researchers from the World Agroforestry Centre have a...

A talk with the Tala-andig tribe: thoughts on development, deeper engagement and mutual respect

Research and development aim to benefit communities but how should researchers and indigenous people work together in projects? Here are some thoughts on development, deeper engagement and mutual respect based on discussions between the Tala-andig tribe and ICRAF researchers. It...

Success factors for land and water management in Africa

At present, large expanses of land in rural Africa are degraded as a result of over extraction of trees for timber, firewood and charcoal. The problem is exacerbated by poor crop and animal husbandry practices, such as growing...

Agroforests expanding across landscapes in Northwest Viet Nam

After five years, the proven benefits of agroforestry have inspired farmers to expand from plots to entire landscapes.   By Nguyen Anh Thu and Tran Ha My   A project in the harsh environment of Northwest Viet Nam,...

Business-case training workshop jump-starts co-investment in Philippine watershed

Farmers and members of the Payments for Ecosystems Services Working Group of Lantapan sub-watersheds are learning how to develop business cases for co-investment in agroforestry.   Most markets in the world don’t really trade in ‘watershed protection’ and...

Success in thirsty Sumba a challenge for researchers

Dryland tropical agroforestry is a little-researched area that is likely to be increasingly in demand as climate patterns change. Researchers on the island of Sumba in Indonesia are working hard and fast to meet the challenges.   Sumba’s...

Surviving the long dry season in Konawe Selatan with improved farming systems

Farmers in Indonesia are more optimistic about surviving the increasingly long dry seasons thanks to the World Agroforestry Centre improving their understanding of agroforestry and drip irrigation.   By Amy Lumban Gaol   Up until recently, for farmers...

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