Category: Trees

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya is a science writer and communications specialist with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Over the past 15 years she has been packaging and disseminating scientific knowledge in the fields of entomology, agriculture, health, HIV/AIDS research, and marine science. Daisy is a Board-certified Editor in the Life Sciences (bels.org) and has a Masters’ degree in chemistry from the University of Connecticut, USA. Her BSc is from the University of Nairobi in her native Kenya. She has worked as a journal editor, science writer, publisher, and communications strategist with various organizations. She joined ICRAF in July 2012.
Twitter: @daisyouya

While raising crop yields, African thorn tree Faidherbia albida captures large amounts of carbon

A large, old Faidherbia albida tree with a metre-plus diameter stored the equivalent of the CO2 emitted by 8 cars over one year. These useful trees play an important role in carbon sequestration, a critical part of the...

Finding long-term solutions for degraded peat land: video

A video has been released that documents research in Jambi Province, Indonesia on how best to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from land use on peat, including intercropping oil palm and other crops.   A video released by the World...

At launch, the Wangari Maathai Foundation unveils major project for environment and society

Hundreds of friends, partners and supporters joined the family of Kenya’s celebrated environmentalist and Africa’s first woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize in launching the Wangari Maathai Foundation, on 11 March 2016. The colourful event at the...

Success in thirsty Sumba a challenge for researchers

Dryland tropical agroforestry is a little-researched area that is likely to be increasingly in demand as climate patterns change. Researchers on the island of Sumba in Indonesia are working hard and fast to meet the challenges.   Sumba’s...

For more and better-quality food production, take care of pollinators

The evidence is clear: For big gains in crop production, our landscapes must become more hospitable to some of the planet’s littlest creatures— its pollinators. Bees, birds, butterflies, moths and some small mammals transfer pollen from flower to...