Category: Trees

Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist. As well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization.

The significance of planted teak for smallholders

  Teak is one of the most sought-after hardwoods in the world. A substantial amount is grown by smallholders in Latin America, Africa and Asia, who need help to improve production.   James M. Roshetko and Aulia Perdana of...

Winners and losers in tree domestication: the agarwood story

  A forest tree is being domesticated that produces a substance as valuable as gold. But it’s not as simple as it might seem.   Domestication of forest products that are overharvested in the wild is expected to...

How U.N. proposed climate budget cuts will impact REDD+ programs

In July, a community-led Kenyan conservation organization called Mikoko Pamoja, Mangroves Together, was among the 2017 Equator Prize winners. The program was singled out as an exceptional REDD+ project, Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, a global...

Farms, forests and fuel in Sweden and Indonesia

The head of state of Sweden visited Indonesia and attended a seminar on the role of forestry in sustainable development.

Agroforest landscapes to reduce the risk of floods?

There is a lack of evidence of the effects of trees on reducing, or worsening, floods. Arguments continue about whether the research results that do exist from small-scale studies also apply at larger scales. A new technique is...

A world with trees but without the word forest – a thought experiment

The recent paper “China’s fight to halt tree cover loss” carefully avoided the word ‘forest’ in its title. It challenged the various definitions of forest that may cause more confusion than necessary, and preferred the more objectively observable...