Category: Natural Resource Management

'Alone', a photo by Yudha Lesmana, was finalist in the XIV World Forestry Congress photo competition. http://bit.ly/1OjlqSp

Safeguarding the world’s freshwater resources: Global Forests and Water Action Plan launched

One-third of the world’s largest cities—including New York, Mumbai and Bogotá—rely directly on forests for a large proportion of their drinking water. A new five-year action plan for forests and water was launched on 8 September 2015 at...

Preparing to dialogue. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

Policy dialogue on social forestry in Southeast Asia: investing in a sustainable future for people and forests

‘Forestry is not about trees, it is about people. And it is about trees only insofar as trees can serve the needs of people.’ Jack Westoby   Key messages from the policy dialogue In order to ensure that...

An artist's impression of a Kapchorwa landscape. Source: Kapchorwa District Landcare Chapter

Community bylaws improve landscape management

Experience from Uganda shows that when villages and districts create regulations to manage forests and restoration, benefits flow.   Through collective awareness of land-management challenges at the grassroots level, governments and others are effectively coerced to make policy...

Photo courtesy of Brad Ruggles via Flickr

More than just cooking: linking energy and food security

There is no doubt that energy is embedded in food production, food distribution and food preparation. Yet practitioners in the two sectors tend to work separately without taking into consideration the interdependences of the two development challenges. What...

History of 'the landscape approach'. Source: Center for International Forestry Research

Approach a landscape from the ground or lose your way in words

A ‘landscape approach’ has been bandied about by researchers and development practitioners for decades. But what exactly is it? Does it work? It’s time to start finding out, on the ground.   The term ‘landscape approach’ was first...