Category: Landscape

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya is a science writer and communications specialist with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Over the past 15 years she has been packaging and disseminating scientific knowledge in the fields of entomology, agriculture, health, HIV/AIDS research, and marine science. Daisy is a Board-certified Editor in the Life Sciences (bels.org) and has a Masters’ degree in chemistry from the University of Connecticut, USA. Her BSc is from the University of Nairobi in her native Kenya. She has worked as a journal editor, science writer, publisher, and communications strategist with various organizations. She joined ICRAF in July 2012. Twitter: @daisyouya

‘De-risk’ the wood energy sector to unleash green growth

With population growth and urbanization, the demand for energy from trees is growing rapidly around the world. This demand presents a golden opportunity for wood energy be a force for energy security, sustainable development and greener economies. But...

Community bylaws improve landscape management

Experience from Uganda shows that when villages and districts create regulations to manage forests and restoration, benefits flow.   Through collective awareness of land-management challenges at the grassroots level, governments and others are effectively coerced to make policy...

The right tree for the right place: vegetationmap4africa v2 includes smartphone app

Tree enthusiasts on the move can now identify species as they go, and at the same time gain a deeper understanding of their natural environment, thanks to a new version of vegetationmap4africa (www.vegetationmap4africa.org). The new version of the...

Dr Rob Cramb, SEARCA, Agriculture and Development Seminar

The past, present and future of swidden agriculture

Swidden practices have often been viewed as highly destructive and only used by poor, upland farmers. However, that perception is changing as the practice itself changes.   Part 2 of the changing story of swidden agriculture. Read parts...

agroforestry trial, Northwest Viet Nam

Agroforests set to replace monocrops in Northwest Viet Nam

Land degradation owing to monocropping is the main reason for reduced agricultural productivity in Northwest Viet Nam. But after four years of agroforestry research, results show positive signs for farmers.   Monocropping of annuals—such as maize, rice and...