Category: Forest

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya is a science writer and communications specialist with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Over the past 15 years she has been packaging and disseminating scientific knowledge in the fields of entomology, agriculture, health, HIV/AIDS research, and marine science. Daisy is a Board-certified Editor in the Life Sciences (bels.org) and has a Masters’ degree in chemistry from the University of Connecticut, USA. Her BSc is from the University of Nairobi in her native Kenya. She has worked as a journal editor, science writer, publisher, and communications strategist with various organizations. She joined ICRAF in July 2012. Twitter: @daisyouya

Sacred wood in Cote d'Ivoire. Photo by Emilie Smith/ICRAF

Forests and society a major theme at the XIV World Forestry Congress

Forest give food and oxygen, stabilize land, improve water quality and availability, reduce the effects of climate change, and provide spaces for cultural activities, reflection and enjoyment. Convened by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and...

Cashew apple and nut

New report says forests and trees could be major factor in efforts to end global hunger

A billion people worldwide depend on forests and trees for balanced diets and sustainable incomes. About one in nine people globally still suffer from hunger, with the majority of the hungry living in Africa and Asia. Forests and...

researchers, systematic review of long-fallow swidden systems in Southeast Asia, SEARCA, seminar

‘Is it good or bad?’ Challenging views about swidden agriculture

Swidden agriculture is often viewed as a highly destructive practice. However, researchers have found that swidden may offer benefits to both resource-poor farmers and the global community.     Part 3 of the changing story of swidden. Read...

Dr Rob Cramb, SEARCA, Agriculture and Development Seminar

The past, present and future of swidden agriculture

Swidden practices have often been viewed as highly destructive and only used by poor, upland farmers. However, that perception is changing as the practice itself changes.   Part 2 of the changing story of swidden agriculture. Read parts...