Category: Forest

Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist and currently interim head of communications global. In his role as regional communications specialist, as well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the four countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization. As interim head of communications, Rob manages communications staff in Latin America, Africa and Asia and is overseeing implementation of ICRAF's Global Communications Group restructure.

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From Sumba to Sulawesi: farmers learn from success

Ever wondered what farmers get out of talking with other farmers? Two projects in eastern Indonesia have brought farmers together to learn and inspire.   A group of farmers from the dry island of Sumba, Indonesia visited neighbouring...

Photo: Ricky Martin/CIFOR

International Day of Forests 2016: What’s the state of the world’s forests?

Originally published on Forest News. In 2012 the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 21 March the International Day of Forests. The Day provides a platform to raise awareness on the importance of forests and trees and the myriad...

The Green Belt Movement that Prof. Maathai founded has planted over 5 million trees and championed women's empowerment and good governance. Photo courtesy of the Green Belt Movement:  http://www.greenbeltmovement.org/sites/greenbeltmovement.org/files/smiling-faces.jpg

At launch, the Wangari Maathai Foundation unveils major project for environment and society

Hundreds of friends, partners and supporters joined the family of Kenya’s celebrated environmentalist and Africa’s first woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize in launching the Wangari Maathai Foundation, on 11 March 2016. The colourful event at the...

bee-coffee

For more and better-quality food production, take care of pollinators

The evidence is clear: For big gains in crop production, our landscapes must become more hospitable to some of the planet’s littlest creatures— its pollinators. Bees, birds, butterflies, moths and some small mammals transfer pollen from flower to...

Moringa-based agroforestry in Konso, southern Ethiopia is a traditional soil conservation and tree planting practice that can be drawn on for landscape restoration. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/A Gebrekirstos

Reaching the ‘how’ of landscape restoration: experts from ICRAF, IUCN discuss in Paris

As climate negotiators wrangled in Paris towards the historic agreement this December, scientists and policy makers elsewhere in the city were equally fixated on landscapes and how to restore them. Landscape restoration locks up carbon in the soil...