Category: Conservation

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya is a science writer and communications specialist with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Over the past 15 years she has been packaging and disseminating scientific knowledge in the fields of entomology, agriculture, health, HIV/AIDS research, and marine science. Daisy is a Board-certified Editor in the Life Sciences (bels.org) and has a Masters’ degree in chemistry from the University of Connecticut, USA. Her BSc is from the University of Nairobi in her native Kenya. She has worked as a journal editor, science writer, publisher, and communications strategist with various organizations. She joined ICRAF in July 2012.
Twitter: @daisyouya

Success factors for land and water management in Africa

At present, large expanses of land in rural Africa are degraded as a result of over extraction of trees for timber, firewood and charcoal. The problem is exacerbated by poor crop and animal husbandry practices, such as growing...

From Sumba to Sulawesi: farmers learn from success

Ever wondered what farmers get out of talking with other farmers? Two projects in eastern Indonesia have brought farmers together to learn and inspire.   A group of farmers from the dry island of Sumba, Indonesia visited neighbouring...

Jeneponto District strategises to create sustainable livelihoods and conserve the environment

Jeneponto in the province of South Sulawesi, Indonesia, has officially begun to implement a sustainable livelihoods and conservation strategy that was facilitated by the Agroforestry and Forestry in Sulawesi project.   The launch of the strategy was marked...

At launch, the Wangari Maathai Foundation unveils major project for environment and society

Hundreds of friends, partners and supporters joined the family of Kenya’s celebrated environmentalist and Africa’s first woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize in launching the Wangari Maathai Foundation, on 11 March 2016. The colourful event at the...

For more and better-quality food production, take care of pollinators

The evidence is clear: For big gains in crop production, our landscapes must become more hospitable to some of the planet’s littlest creatures— its pollinators. Bees, birds, butterflies, moths and some small mammals transfer pollen from flower to...

Immense benefits from agroforestry in rural Cameroon

Yaounde — Commercial agriculture has received a major boost and the impact of climate change minimised in Cameroon thanks to the adoption of agroforestry techniques by thousands of farmers. The World Agroforestry Centre introduced agroforestry methods to rural...