Category: Genetic Resources

Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist and currently interim head of communications global. In his role as regional communications specialist, as well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the four countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization. As interim head of communications, Rob manages communications staff in Latin America, Africa and Asia and is overseeing implementation of ICRAF's Global Communications Group restructure.

Farmers in a rice-and-agroforestry landscape in Indonesia. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre

Helping rice farmers grow trees for adapting to climate change

  Trees in, and around, rice fields help farmers’ become more resilient to climate change, improve their incomes and protect the environment. A new practical manual helps guide farmers in Southeast Asia, the rice bowl of the world....

Croton nuts have been shown to contain high concentrations of oil and can be used to produce a fuel that could serve as an alternative to diesel.

Bioenergy and sustainability in Latin America and Africa: bridging the gaps through South–South learning

A group of 50 bioenergy experts from around the world met between 31 October and 2 November 2016 in São Paulo, Brazil to discuss the challenges and opportunities for developing sustainable bioenergy in Latin America and Africa. I...

Baobab (Adansonia digitata) tree. Get information on this and other tree species on the Agroforestry Species Switchboard. Photo by Stepha McMullin/ICRAF

Latest Agroforestry Species Switchboard offers additional plant databases

By Roeland Kindt and Ian Dawson The Agroforestry Species Switchboard is a “one-stop-shop” to retrieve data about a particular plant species across a wide range of information sources. Its objective is to provide information that supports research on...

Bag of Frankincense at Spice Souk. Photo by Liz Lawley via Wikimedia Commons

‘Tis the season for frankincense, a suitable restoration tree for the Horn of Africa

There’s one more reason to be jolly this season: the frankincense tree—source of one of the precious gifts of the Magi in the Christmas story—is being called “a suitable tree species for use in dryland restoration under a...

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Genebanking.

By Mike Jackson This post was first published on the blog of Mike Jackson As part of the evaluation of the CGIAR’s program on Managing and Sustaining Crop Collections (aka the Genebanks CRP), my colleague Professor Brian Ford-Lloyd...

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Research cuts a potential new path to faster, cheaper tropical forest restoration: Thinning

A common way to restore a degraded forest is to plant seedlings and nurture these into full trees. Indeed, to most people restoration and tree-planting (with native species) are virtually synonymous. Planting and nurturing tree seedlings over a...