Category: Bioenergy

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya is a science writer and communications specialist with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Over the past 15 years she has been packaging and disseminating scientific knowledge in the fields of entomology, agriculture, health, HIV/AIDS research, and marine science. Daisy is a Board-certified Editor in the Life Sciences (bels.org) and has a Masters’ degree in chemistry from the University of Connecticut, USA. Her BSc is from the University of Nairobi in her native Kenya. She has worked as a journal editor, science writer, publisher, and communications strategist with various organizations. She joined ICRAF in July 2012.
Twitter: @daisyouya

World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) Statement to High Level Segment at COP22, Marrakech, November 2016

The Paris climate change agreement came into force on 4 November 2016—an unprecedented event. And the COP22 climate talks here in Marrakech have been all about turning that agreement into action on the ground. The big question for all,...

Research cuts a potential new path to faster, cheaper tropical forest restoration: Thinning

A common way to restore a degraded forest is to plant seedlings and nurture these into full trees. Indeed, to most people restoration and tree-planting (with native species) are virtually synonymous. Planting and nurturing tree seedlings over a...

A Better Deal—Incentivising wise land use with the Tropical Landscape Finance Facility

The private and public sectors got together in Jakarta this week to launch the commercially innovative Tropical Landscapes Finance Facility (TLFF). This enterprising initiative, exceeding USD 1.1 billion of investments, will provide long-term finance (10-15 years) to projects...

What makes a farmer grow a tree? It depends.

Is it enough to recommend tree species to farmers? Or even to supply them with the right seedlings and advice on growing them? Across Africa bold campaigns, such as the African Forest Landscape Restoration Initiative (AFR100), are underway to...

It only takes prunings from trees on farms and efficient stoves for smallholder farmers to meet their cooking energy needs

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), about 2.5 billion people in the world, mostly in developing countries, depend on biomass energy for cooking and heating. In sub-Saharan Africa alone, over 90% of the population rely on wood...