Category: Nutrition

Kate Langford

Kate Langford

Kate Langford is a consultant writer with close to 20 years’ experience in communicating natural resource, environmental and land management issues for various government and non-government organizations. She previously worked as Communications Specialist for the World Agroforestry Centre in Kenya and has worked in Indonesia, Laos, Vietnam and Australia. She holds a Bachelor of Science and a Graduate Diploma in Scientific Communication.

Nursery-Fruit Tree Potfolio Establishment at Satellite Nursery-Machakos

First ‘fruit tree portfolios’ established in Kenya, in a novel approach to improved year-round nutrition

World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) researchers have launched a novel approach to tackle the problem of micronutrient deficiencies, also known as ‘hidden hunger.’ The fruit tree portfolio approach involves cultivating a set of fruit trees on farms, which is carefully...

Eric Ng’ethe (Right) explains the principles of the fruit tree portfolio to farmers. Photo by Danyell Odhiambo/ICRAF

Unlocking the potential of sustainable agroforestry practices: Farmers meet ICRAF staff at agricultural fair

It’s a bright morning on Wednesday 24 June, 2015 and the four-day Agricultural Society of Kenya (A.S.K) Show in Machakos has just began. This is arguably the most popular agricultural and trade exhibition in the semi-arid region of...

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Son tra, the H’mong Apple

By Lua Hoang Thi and Ake E Mamo   Son tra, aka the H’mong apple, taorung, maccam, or macsamcha depending on whether you are in Vietnam, India, Myanmar, or some southern provinces of China, is an indigenous fruit...

Awach, near Lake Victoria, is flat and flood prone as water rushes off the hills inland, which have lost much of the vegetative covering. Photo by Danyell Odhiambo/ICRAF

Mars and ICRAF: Illuminating the ‘dark box’ of agroforestry

David and Molly Achiando stand among a panoply of trees on their farm. “When it is dry, I have shade,” says Molly, listing the services and products that the trees provide. “I can now give fruit to the...

Rose Koech at her farm in Kembu, Kenya. She has a mixed farm with trees, crops, fodder species and vegetables. Photo by Sherry Odeyo/ICRAF

More money and less risk for African eco-farmers

  A Greenpeace study in Malawi and Kenya has revealed that chemically-intensive farming hurts the bottom line of small-scale farmers; agroecological farming is more profitable. Agroecology refers to a suite of sustainable farming practices that use few or...