Category: Food Trees

Amy Lumban Gaol

Amy Lumban Gaol

Amy Lumban Gaol is the World Agroforestry Centre’s Communications Coordinator for the Agroforestry and Forestry in Sulawesi (AgFor) project based in Makassar, Indonesia. She coordinates an integrated communications strategy within the three provinces where AgFor is working (South and Southeast Sulawesi and Gorontalo), including video production, writing stories and promoting AgFor through various media. Her interests include photography, social media and humanitarian activity.

Mrs Asmarani works in her seed nursery, that has recently been awarded with a certificate of acknowledgement by the local government. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Amy Lumban Gaol

Surviving the long dry season in Konawe Selatan with improved farming systems

Farmers in Indonesia are more optimistic about surviving the increasingly long dry seasons thanks to the World Agroforestry Centre improving their understanding of agroforestry and drip irrigation.   By Amy Lumban Gaol   Up until recently, for farmers...

Overlooked no more, precious fruit tree comes into its own in West Africa’s Sahel

While certainly no stranger to smallholders and fruit lovers in many parts of Africa and Asia, this unassuming fruit tree that is so often overlooked by international research is starting to come into its own, proving itself as...

Food Waste. Photo courtesy of FAO/John Isaac

Why food waste is a concern for tropical forest conservation

Does wasting food lead to the loss of tropical forests? Though not obvious at first glance, researchers say clear links exist between food loss and wastage, and deforestation. This is because clearing intact forests to produce both commodity...

Farmer Athanus Makokha (centre) explains uses of various trees on her farm to lead author of the study, ICRAF’s John Nyaga (right) and field assistant Robert Situma (left) in Trans Nzoia County, Kenya. The indigenous tree Croton macrostachyus grows on the crop field to the left, while other C. macrostachyus trees as well as Grevillea robusta, Cupressus lusitanica and Eucalyptus spp grow around the homestead area in the background. Credit: J. Nyaga

For every tree a reason — research “in” rather than “for” agroforestry development

In their ground-breaking article about the importance of inserting research into agroforestry development, Ric Coe, Fergus Sinclair and Edmund Barrios of the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) emphasize how important this small but extremely significant change in wording —...

Map of the world's degraded land. Source: Bonn Challenge

The global agroforestry challenge

The world’s leaders have been set the challenge of restoring more than 350 million hectares by 2030. Researchers see agroforestry as the key to making it happen.   ‘Around 20–25% of global land is degraded, affecting 1.5 billion...

Nipa palms Philippines Amy C Cruz

The potential of trees for energy

Further exploration of sustainable tree-based bioenergy could help improve the lives and livelihoods of communities around the world.   Most of the energy used in the world comes from fossil fuels, which are not sustainable as sources will...