a.c.cruz@cgiar.org'

Amy Cruz

Amy Cruz is the communications officer for the World Agroforestry Centre Philippines. She is developing an integrated communications strategy for the Philippine program, scripting and editing videos and promoting projects through various media. Her other interests include social media, writing and photography. She has a Bachelor of Science in Development Communication, major in Science Communication.

The potential of trees for energy

Further exploration of sustainable tree-based bioenergy could help improve the lives and livelihoods of communities around the world.   Most of the energy used in the world comes from fossil fuels, which are not sustainable as sources will...

Agroforestry farmers’ field schools spread the word effectively

A series of field schools in Sulawesi, Indonesia are helping share advanced knowledge about agroforestry throughout the island   By Enggar Paramita   After being implemented for two years in South and Southeast Sulawesi provinces in Indonesia, a...

More transfer of knowledge needed South–South

Tropical forest countries at the World Forestry Congress call for greater cooperation to share experience between farmers, advisors and governments   ‘We are all talking about how to transfer knowledge from scientists and government to farmers’, summarised Dr...

Trees for food and income in Uganda

The Daily Monitor reports on a 3-year project being run by Makerere University School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences which is encouraging farmers in Uganda to grow trees for food security and income. Through the project, farmers In...

First ‘fruit tree portfolios’ established in Kenya, in a novel approach to improved year-round nutrition

World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) researchers have launched a novel approach to tackle the problem of micronutrient deficiencies, also known as ‘hidden hunger.’ The fruit tree portfolio approach involves cultivating a set of fruit trees on farms, which is carefully...

Unlocking the potential of sustainable agroforestry practices: Farmers meet ICRAF staff at agricultural fair

It’s a bright morning on Wednesday 24 June, 2015 and the four-day Agricultural Society of Kenya (A.S.K) Show in Machakos has just began. This is arguably the most popular agricultural and trade exhibition in the semi-arid region of...

Son tra, the H’mong Apple

By Lua Hoang Thi and Ake E Mamo   Son tra, aka the H’mong apple, taorung, maccam, or macsamcha depending on whether you are in Vietnam, India, Myanmar, or some southern provinces of China, is an indigenous fruit...

Mars and ICRAF: Illuminating the ‘dark box’ of agroforestry

David and Molly Achiando stand among a panoply of trees on their farm. “When it is dry, I have shade,” says Molly, listing the services and products that the trees provide. “I can now give fruit to the...

More money and less risk for African eco-farmers

  A Greenpeace study in Malawi and Kenya has revealed that chemically-intensive farming hurts the bottom line of small-scale farmers; agroecological farming is more profitable. Agroecology refers to a suite of sustainable farming practices that use few or...

New report says forests and trees could be major factor in efforts to end global hunger

A billion people worldwide depend on forests and trees for balanced diets and sustainable incomes. About one in nine people globally still suffer from hunger, with the majority of the hungry living in Africa and Asia. Forests and...

Easier and faster processing of njansang heralds opportunities for local development

Ricinodendron heudelotii, locally known as Njansang (or njansa), is a forest tree found in Cameroon and other countries along Africa’s tropical belt. Women and children traditionally collect njansang fruit in the forest and undertake the labourious, time-intensive job...

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