c.watson@cgiar.org'

Cathy Watson

Cathy Watson is chief of programme development at the World Agroforestry Centre in Nairobi. Before joining ICRAF in November 2012, she founded and ran two NGOs in Uganda -- Straight Talk Foundation and Mvule Trust. She was made a senior Ashoka fellow for social entrepreneurship in 2006. She has also been a foreign correspondent, working for The Guardian and the BBC, among others. A graduate in biology and Latin American Studies from Princeton, she has over 30 years of work experience in Africa with a focus on trees, youth, HIV, families, and communication for social change. She holds a graduate certificate in agroforestry from the University of Missouri.

‘Income that surpasses the waiting’: in dire need of trees, Malawi tries woodlots, bees, bamboo

Success in rejuvenating land through forest-based enterprises has had dramatic outcomes for farmers. In the late afternoon in the highlands of Malawi, the air is chilly as the sun descends. But the welcome is warm. A group of...

Drylands Development Programme: changed lives in the Sahel

DryDev helped develop farmer-managed natural regeneration in agricultural fields, leading to reforestation with multiple local and exotic species that now contribute to strengthening natural forests and providing woodfuel and food, which can be prepared on the improved cookstoves deployed by DryDev, which reduce fuelwood consumption by two-thirds.

Agroforestry at 40: how tree-farm science has changed the world

“Agroforestry” – the practice of having trees as part of farms – is as old as agriculture itself. But as a field of scientific enquiry and policy making, it’s now marking its 40th birthday.

Restoring drylands and empowering farmers: lessons from the Drylands Development Programme

  Successful land restoration needs human capacity, innovative technologies and mass participation. The countries of the Sahel Region of West Africa are vulnerable to the impact of large-scale environmental and land degradation, poor soil infertility, climate change, population...

The Tamale Declaration: a regreening plan for northern Ghana

  An international workshop has called for an integrated plan to regreen the region.   The climax of the international workshop held late November 2018 in Tamale, the capital of Ghana’s Northern Region, was when the nearly 60...

The potential of agroforestry to enhance Land Degradation Neutrality: case study from Tanzania

Researchers highlight how the ngitili agroforestry system aids land restoration, in a new publication for the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification

Free community labour: critical to Ethiopia’s drive to restore land and improve livelihoods

  Farmers and pastoralists have contributed countless hours of labour across Ethiopia’s vast and varied landscapes through an under-recognized program   By Emily Sigman*   Farmers and pastoralists in Ethiopia have provided huge amounts of time and labour,...

Restoring degraded tropical dryland in extreme conditions: the case of Sumba Island

Sumba in eastern Indonesia has been almost totally deforested, has only patches of thin soil on limestone savannahs and a wet season that has contracted to three months a year. Farmers have been struggling to survive yet nonetheless...

From Sumba to Sulawesi: farmers learn from success

Ever wondered what farmers get out of talking with other farmers? Two projects in eastern Indonesia have brought farmers together to learn and inspire.   A group of farmers from the dry island of Sumba, Indonesia visited neighbouring...

Agroforestry leads as investors and governments support land restoration in Latin America

The global land restoration movement launched in Bonn five years ago is gaining steam. It’s big and it’s ambitious. In Latin America and the Caribbean, where it is called Initiative 20X20, it aims to bring 20 million hectares...