Category: CRP6.3-Landscape management for environmental services, biodiversity conservation and livelihoods

Eike Luedeling

Eike Luedeling

Eike Luedeling joined the World Agroforestry Centre in 2010 as Climate Change Scientist. His research focuses on projecting the image of climate change on agricultural systems to assist in the design of locally appropriate adaptation strategies. He has also worked on the carbon sequestration potential of agroforestry systems in the Sahel. Prior to joining ICRAF Eike was a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of California Davis in the USA. He has a PhD in Agronomy from the University of Kassel, Germany and an MSc in International Agricultural Development from the University of California in Davis.

A holistic approach to improving development decisions

Research in agriculture seeks to generate new approaches or technologies that can be used to make a difference in farmers’ lives, and for the broader society. Well-designed technologies can have major positive impacts, as well as providing evidence...

The ‘hidden’ biodiversity sustaining our agricultural systems

The term ‘biodiversity’ conjures up images of trees, plants, insects and mammals, which are increasingly recognized as important in sustaining agricultural landscapes. But what of the biodiversity which exists under the ground? How important is this to agricultural...

Growing hope with trees: farmers’ learning groups in Buol, Indonesia

Farmers in the district of Buol in Central Sulawesi Province have formed learning groups to better understand tree management to improve their livelihoods in the face of climate change.   By Dienda Citasyari Putri Hendrawan   ‘We don’t...

Bhutan learns how to improve payments for ecosystem services

Staff of the Bhutan Government have been trained by the World Agroforestry Centre in methods for improving their ecosystem services’ schemes.   Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) are incentive-based schemes that bridge conservation initiatives and community livelihoods. The...

Hosing down hype but not burying hope

Ten years ago there were high hopes that an oil-bearing tree or shrub could be part of the answer to the world’s quest for biofuel. By now the ‘hype’ has almost been forgotten. As in most of these...

Farmers and funders need to open their eyes to the benefits of integrated landscapes

Focussing only on the commercial value of crops leaves farmers and funders poorer. The services provided by integrated agro-ecosystems offer greater benefits to all.   ‘The first challenge is to make smallholders aware that they can contribute to...