Category: Climate Change Blogs

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya

Daisy Ouya is a science writer and communications specialist with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Over the past 15 years she has been packaging and disseminating scientific knowledge in the fields of entomology, agriculture, health, HIV/AIDS research, and marine science. Daisy is a Board-certified Editor in the Life Sciences (bels.org) and has a Masters’ degree in chemistry from the University of Connecticut, USA. Her BSc is from the University of Nairobi in her native Kenya. She has worked as a journal editor, science writer, publisher, and communications strategist with various organizations. She joined ICRAF in July 2012. Twitter: @daisyouya

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Research cuts a potential new path to faster, cheaper tropical forest restoration: Thinning

A common way to restore a degraded forest is to plant seedlings and nurture these into full trees. Indeed, to most people restoration and tree-planting (with native species) are virtually synonymous. Planting and nurturing tree seedlings over a...

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The Shinyanga revolution: Tanzanian success story creates momentum for land restoration

Blog originally published on the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA) website. By Kerstin Reisdorf With massive commitments to land restoration such as the Bonn Challenge and the AFR100, there is a buzz in the...

Agroforestry for Dairy Farming:
Rose Koech, milking a cow at her farm in Kembu, Bomet County in Kenya. She grows fodder trees, shrubs and grass for dairy cattle. World Agroforestry Centre/Sherry Odeyo

Stakeholders move to enhance productivity and efficiency in Kenya’s dairy sector for lower greenhouse gas emissions

As part of the historic UN Paris Climate Agreement of 2015, countries committed to fight climate change by reducing their greenhouse gas emissions from various sectors, including agriculture. Kenya is not being left behind. Stakeholders from the dairy...

The banyan tree, Ficus benghalensis in Hawaii. Photo ©Mike Shanahan

Fig trees throw down a lifeline to a healthier planet

Fig trees were here when dinosaurs first roamed the planet. And today, just as they did 80 million years ago, Ficus species continue to bring nourishment, shade, water and numerous other gifts to people and plants. What’s more,...