Author: Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist. As well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization.

Farms with trees and crops recover quicker from natural disasters

New evidence shows that having trees on farms helps farmers be more resilient to most types of natural disasters. But to support farmers making the gradual change to more trees, land-use planners themselves need support.   Although tree-based...

oil palm, mineral soil, Indonesia

Oil palm on mineral soil in Indonesia is not changing soil carbon

The amount of carbon stored in mineral soil doesn’t change whether the land has been formerly forested or not, say scientists at the World Agroforestry Centre Indonesia   About 15% of the oil palm grown in Indonesia is...

Agroforestry is vital to the ASEAN economic community

Facing an uncertain future, the millions of farmers who feed the 617 million people of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations need more support to secure and agroforest their landscapes in the face of climate change and rapid...

swidden, landscape

Key lessons for REDD+ schemes in swidden landscapes

Most forests are rich in ‘natural’ resources but they are also rich because local people have enriched forests through their knowledge and practice, such as in shifting cultivation, or swidden. Understanding how this works is critical for any...

REDD+, equity, publications

Equity and REDD+: are we there yet?

The global scheme to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from deforestation and degradation plus conservation needs equitable distribution of both costs and benefits if it is to achieve its goals   Reducing greenhouse-gas emissions—and hence limiting global warming—by slowing or...

regrowth, sloping land, Myanmar

ASEAN economic integration means huge challenges for trees, farmers and food supply

Ten Southeast Asian nations will form a single economic bloc at the end of 2015. Agroforestry, forestry and agricultural policies, implementation and law enforcement are lagging behind. The gap threatens millions of livelihoods, environmental safety and national abilities...