Reliable and affordable methods for measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture now available

The International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) is one of many centers that are measuring greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture in tropical, developing countries. Photo: N. Palmer (CIAT)

The International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) is one of many centers that are measuring greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture in tropical, developing countries. Photo: N. Palmer (CIAT)

Originally published on the website of the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS)

As countries shift from mitigation commitments to action in the 2016 climate change negotiations and beyond, many countries are unable to plan for emissions reductions in agriculture due to a lack of data.

Recognizing that cost of research has often been an impediment for some countries, authors provide guidance on how to choose from available methods, given users’ objectives, resources, and capacities. 

Screen Shot 2017-01-13 at 9.10.24 AMThe new book, Methods for Measuring Greenhouse Gas Balances and Evaluating Mitigation Options in Smallholder Agriculture, explains how to:

  • Design a measurement program;
  • Quantify stocks, stock changes and fluxes of the major GHG sources and sinks including: land use and land cover change, greenhouse gas emissions from soils, methane emissions due to enteric fermentation in ruminants, biomass carbon, and soil carbon stocks; and
  • Use field measurements to estimate mitigation potential at larger scales, and assess trade-offs between climate change and development objectives.

“These chapters help persons involved in climate action to appraise existing data and develop robust new information to support climate change programs. These types of data that this book discusses form the basis of national communications to the UNFCCC and measurement, reporting and verification requirements of national strategies, including agroforestry and other land management actions, that will come on-line with the implementation of the Paris Climate Agreement,” said Todd Rosenstock, a researcher from the World Agroforestry Centre and co-author of the book.

Read the full blog here.

Download the book:

Rosenstock TS, Rufino MC, Butterbach-Bahl K, Wollenberg E, Richards MB (eds). 2016. Methods for Measuring Greenhouse Gas Balances and Evaluating Mitigation Options in Smallholder Agriculture. New York: Springer. Available free at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29794-1

 

We would like to thank all donors who supported this research through their contributions to the CGIAR Fund.

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Susan Onyango

Susan Onyango

Susan Onyango is the communications specialist for climate change for the World Agroforestry Centre and is based at the headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya. With over 12 year’s experience in communication, she promotes the World Agroforestry Centre’s work on climate change, writes blogs and provides communication advice and support to scientists. Susan holds a MA communication studies and a BA in English. Twitter: @susanonyango

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