Setting the stage for agroforestry expansion in Eastern Congo

Lisez la version française ici: Ouvrir la voie à l’expansion de l’agroforesterie dans l’est du Congo

Smallholder farmers in Lubero Territory in North-Kivu Province, DRC, cultivate steep and heavily degraded slopes resulting in low agricultural productivity. Photo by E. Smith Dumont/ICRAF

Smallholder farmers in Lubero Territory in North-Kivu Province, DRC, cultivate steep and heavily degraded slopes resulting in low agricultural productivity. Photo by E. Smith Dumont/ICRAF

It’s a tall order solving the myriad developmental challenges in North Kivu Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where years of conflict have caused so much human suffering and environmental upheaval. Today the province is plagued by rampant deforestation and land degradation and hence low agricultural production, while also having to cope with high population densities and urbanization rates.

These can all be tackled, according to the provincial Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries, Livestock and Rural Development, Christophe Ndibeshe Byemero, if agroforestry forms the basis for a strategy for sustainable agricultural development.

The Minister was speaking at a workshop held earlier this year in the provincial capital, Goma, to examine ways to develop and expand agroforestry in the area. Organized by the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). The workshop brought together 46 participants from a wide array of local, national and international organizations, with strong representation from civil society groups from many parts of the Province. It marked the culmination of three years of agroforestry research in development in the region that aimed to develop a socially inclusive strategy for scaling up agroforestry and tree diversity.

According to Thierry Lusenge of WWF in the DRC, the time is now ripe to recognize the importance of agroforestry in helping populations adapt to and mitigate climate change, reduce deforestation and improve food security.

Looking back and learning…

Participants at the workshop held in Goma, DRC in March 2016. Photo by R Byamungu

The workshop was the last of three held in the region as part of the project, Forests and Climate Change in the Congo (FCCC), funded by the European Union and led by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). The agroforestry component of the FCCC project, led by ICRAF, was a part of the CGIAR research programme on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

It built on the knowledge gleaned from previous workshops and acquired through interviews with diverse groups in the area, bringing together participants from four territories in North Kivu. Participants looked back at their agroforestry accomplishments over the past three years and at lessons learned from the diverse projects they’d been part of.

Deogratias Mumberi Kyalwahi of the women’s conservation group, Femmes Actives pour la Conservation de la Faune et de la Flore (FACF), presented findings from a project to establish agroforestry and improve agricultural production around the city of Beni, as a way of reducing human encroachment in the neighbouring Virunga National Park.

Entrance to the Virunga National Park, Rutshuru, North-Kivu, DRC. Photo by E. Smith Dumont

Entrance to the Virunga National Park, Rutshuru, North-Kivu, DRC. Photo by E. Smith Dumont

Virunga is a World Heritage site that boasts 2,000 plant species as well as endangered animal species including the iconic mountain gorilla.

Fataki Baloti, representing the youth conservation group Jeunes pour des Ecosystèmes décents et l’Assainissement de la Nature (JEAN), spoke of their work to achieve food security and combat malnutrition, by integrating livestock production and agroforestry, which improved relations between local people and the Congolese wildlife authority, Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN), which is responsible for the national park.

Improved human welfare around the park, with more – and more diverse – tree cover that provides income, environmental services and contributes to food security, is critical for preserving the park and for peaceful, constructive interactions between nature conservationists and local people.

Other participants highlighted peri-urban agroforestry projects around Goma to combat poverty and malnutrition – introducing shade trees in coffee systems in the Beni territory, trees for improving soils in Rutshuru territory, and promoting raising and selling tree seedlings in Lubero and Kirumba towns.

Farmers working with youth conservation group JEAN experiment with passion fruit and Grevillea robusta in, Musienene, Lubero, North-Kivu. Photo by E. Smith Dumont

Farmers working with youth conservation group JEAN experiment with passion fruit and Grevillea robusta in, Musienene, Lubero, North-Kivu. Photo by E. Smith Dumont

Emilie Smith Dumont of ICRAF explained that agroforestry “while not a panacea, can contribute to making livelihoods and landscapes more sustainable”. She emphasized that it involves many different practices suitable for different people and places, such as planting trees on contour slopes, establishing windbreaks for pastures or fodder banks, fruit trees in orchards and homegardens.  These include diverse tree species adapted to different environments and to specific needs of the farmers themselves.

Removing barriers to adoption

Participants agreed that while significant progress has been made in collecting information on promising native tree species for agroforestry in the region, and in developing practical tools, including a technical agroforestry guide that helps people to put agroforestry knowledge into practice, some key changes in policy and practise are needed for further agroforestry expansion and development in the region.

They identified seven major issues that need to be addressed in an integrated way – gender, markets and commercialization, governance, availability of and access to quality tree planting material, improving agroforestry know-how given low literacy rates, threats such as fire and pests, and, cultural realities.

Gender and tenure at the fore

Women farmers trade at the evening market in Kitchanga, Masisi, North-Kivu, after a day in the field. Many members of the community are internally displaced and farming marginal land with no tenure security.. Photo by E Smith Dumont.

Two issues – tenure and gender – emerged as perhaps the most pressing constraints.  On theissue of gender, Vea Kaghoma of the league of women’s smallholder organizations in DRC, Ligue des Organisations des Femmes Paysannes du Congo, was adamant and unequivocal. Speaking at the closing of the workshop, she said women, who constitute the majority of farmers and traders, should be at the heart of all agroforestry efforts in North Kivu and that the participation of women’s organizations is indispensable if these efforts are going to succeed. 

Emilie Smith Dumont of ICRAF concurs. “Without secure land tenure, especially for women, it is difficult to progress to the next step of really scaling up agroforestry in DRC,” she says. Farmers cannot begin to envisage making long-term investments in their land health or in tree planting if they do not have secure access to land.

Spreading the word

 Dumont Smith is greatly encouraged by the momentum that emerged from the workshops, and at on-going work by participants to put into practise what they have learned over the past three years.

The local NGO, PACOPAD, works with schools to promote planting of passion fruit and tree tomatoes, aiming to grow vitamin-rich fruit and improve nutrition. Photo by Subira Bonhomme.

Wilson Kasereka Kabwana, president of a group to support and consolidate peace and development in North Kivu (Programme d’Appui à la Consolidation de la Paix et le Développement or PACOPAD), reports that his group has now developed a nursery for several agroforestry species. They work with local communities and schools to spread the word on their value for nutrition, as medicine or for the environmental services they provide.

Mone Van Geit, Project Manager International Programs, WWF Belgium, says the idea is to continue to cultivate the strong partnerships that were forged during the FCCC project, with strategies that will permit WWF to support local communities in diversifying species and practices to address a broader range of stakeholder needs. When it comes to energy woodlots, which she says remain a key priority for WWF around the park, diversification and inclusion of native species will be high on the agenda. This will require innovative approaches to test mechanisms for incentives and trials for species carefully designed and evaluated.

Fergus Sinclair who leads the systems domain at ICRAF said he hopes that ICRAF, WWF, their partners in DRC, and new ones with an interest in tenure, gender and markets, will be able to secure support for multidisciplinary projects that will build on the foundation laid by FCCC and act as the launch pad for agroforestry development in the region.

In the words of the provincial minister, Christophe Ndibeshe Byemero, in ten years, if partners continue to work together, North Kivu could become a veritable “model of agroforestry”.

For more information on this work, please contact Emilie Smith Dumont:  e.smith@cgiar.org

Workshop report: http://www.worldagroforestry.org/output/north-kivu-report-workshop-drc

More about ICRAF’s “research in development” approach can be found in these two blogs: One small change of words – a giant leap in effectiveness! and For every tree a reason — research “in” rather than “for” agroforestry development

More about the FCCC project can be found in this blog: Outside a national park, agroforestry helping to save forests inside the park.

More about the technical agroforestry guide developed for North Kivu as part of the FCCC project: Beyond eucalyptus woodlots: what’s on the agroforestry menu for communities around Virunga? The technical guide (available in French only) is available here: Guide technique d’agroforesterie pour la selection de la gestion des arbres au Nord-Kivu



Ouvrir la voie à l’expansion de l’agroforesterie dans l’est du Congo

 

Les petits exploitants du territoire de Lubero, dans la province du Nord-Kivu, en RDC, cultivent des terrains très pentus et fortement dégradés, entrainant une faible productivité agricole. Photo prise par E. Smith Dumont / ICRAF DRC, cultivate steep and heavily degraded slopes resulting in low agricultural productivity. Photo by E. Smith Dumont/ICRAF

Les petits exploitants du territoire de Lubero, dans la province du Nord-Kivu, en RDC, cultivent des terrains très pentus et fortement dégradés, entrainant une faible productivité agricole. Photo prise par E. Smith Dumont / ICRAF

C’est un grand défi que de résoudre les innombrables problèmes de développement dans la province du Nord-Kivu à l’est de la République démocratique du Congo (RDC), où des années de conflit ont créés une immense souffrance humaine et de grands bouleversements environnementaux. Actuellement, la province est en proie à une déforestation rampante et à une forte dégradation des sols occasionnant ainsi une faible production agricole, auxquelles sont confrontées des densités de population élevées avec un accès réduit aux terres arables.

Nous pouvons  faire face à tout cela, selon Christophe Ndibeshe Byemero (le ministre de l’Agriculture, de la Pêche, de l’Elevage et du Développement Rural), si l’agroforesterie constitue la base d’une stratégie de développement agricole durable.

Le ministre s’est prononcé lors d’un atelier tenu à Goma, la capitale provinciale, au début de cette année afin d’analyser les moyens de développer et de pérenniser l’agroforesterie dans la région. L’atelier a été organisé par le Centre Mondial pour l’Agroforesterie (ICRAF) et le Fonds Mondial pour la Nature (WWF). Cet atelier a réuni 46 participants provenant d’un large éventail d’organisations locales, nationales et internationales avec une forte représentation de la société civile prévenant de différents territoires de la Province. L’atelier était le point culminant de trois ans de recherche en agroforesterie pour le développement dans la région ayant pour objectif le développement d’une stratégie d’inclusion sociale pour promouvoir l’agroforesterie et la diversité des arbres.
Selon Thierry Lusenge du WWF en RDC, il est temps de reconnaître l’importance de l’agroforesterie pour aider les populations à s’adapter aux changements climatiques et à les atténuer, à réduire la déforestation tout en améliorant la sécurité alimentaire.

Un regard sur le passé et les leçons apprises…

 Légende de la photo: Participants à l'atelier tenu à Goma en RDC en mars 2016. Photo prise par R Byamungu

Légende de la photo: Participants à l’atelier tenu à Goma en RDC en mars 2016. Photo prise par R Byamungu

L’atelier a été le dernier d’une série de trois ateliers organisés dans la région dans le cadre du projet « Les forêts et le changement climatique au Congo» (FCCC), financé par l’Union européenne et mené par le Centre International pour la  Recherche Forestière (CIFOR). La composante de l’agroforesterie du projet FCCC, dirigé par l’ICRAF, faisait partie du programme de recherche du CGIAR sur les forêts, les arbres et l’agroforesterie.

Cet atelier, réunissant des participants venus de quatre territoires du Nord-Kivu, s’est inspiré des connaissances acquises lors des ateliers précédents, qui eux mêmes s’appuyaient sur le fruit des entretiens avec divers groupes d’acteurs dans la région. Les participants ont passé en revue leurs réalisations en agroforesterie au cours des trois dernières années et les leçons tirées des divers projets auxquels ils avaient participé.

Deogratias Mumberi Kyalwahi de l’organisation féminine,  Femmes Actives pour la Conservation de la Faune et de la Flore (FACF), a présenté les résultats d’un projet ayant pour but la mise en oeuvre de l’agroforesterie et l’amélioration de la production agricole autour de la ville de Beni, comme moyen de réduire l’empiètement du parc national de Virunga par les populations riveraines.

Le parc des Virunga est un site du patrimoine mondial qui compte 2000 espèces de plantes ainsi que des espèces animales menacées, y compris l’emblématique gorille de montagne.

Légende de la photo: L’entrée du parc national de Virunga, Rutshuru, Nord-Kivu, RDC. Photo prise par E. Smith Dumont

Légende de la photo: L’entrée du parc national de Virunga, Rutshuru, Nord-Kivu, RDC. Photo prise par E. Smith Dumont

Fataki Baloti, représentant de l’association « Jeunes pour les Ecosystèmes décents et l’Assainissement de la Nature (JEAN) », a parlé de leur travail pour assurer la sécurité alimentaire et combattre la malnutrition en intégrant la production animale et l’agroforesterie, ce qui contribue à améliorer les relations entre les populations locales et l’autorité congolaise pour la conservation de la nature : Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN), qui est responsable de la gestion du parc national.

 

L’amélioration du bien-être humain autour du parc, avec une couverture arborée de plus en plus diversifiée qui fournit des revenus, des services environnementaux et contribue à la sécurité alimentaire est essentielle pour préserver le parc et pour des interactions pacifiques et constructives entre les conservateurs  de la nature et les populations locales. D’autres participants ont mis l’accent sur des projets agroforestiers périurbains autour de Goma pour lutter contre la pauvreté et la malnutrition, l’introduction des arbres d’ombrage dans les systèmes de caféiculture en territoire de Beni, des arbres pour améliorer les sols dans le territoire de Rutshuru, et la vente de semences et plantules  dans les villes de Lubero et Kirumba.

Emilie Smith Dumont de l’ICRAF a expliqué que l’agroforesterie «sans être une panacée, peut contribuer à rendre les moyens de subsistance et les paysages plus durables».  Elle a souligné que l’agroforesterie peut se décliner en une multitude de pratiques adaptées aux besoins et aux endroits différents, telle que la plantation d’arbres sur les courbes de niveaux , l’établissement de brise-vent pour les pâturages ou les banques fourragères, les arbres fruitiers dans les vergers et les potagers familiaux.

Légende de la photo: Les agriculteurs travaillant avec le groupe de conservation des jeunes JEAN sur l’association de fruits de la passion et Grevillea robusta à Musienene, Lubero, Nord-Kivu. Photo prise par E. SmithDumont

Légende de la photo: Les agriculteurs travaillant avec le groupe de conservation des jeunes JEAN sur l’association de fruits de la passion et Grevillea robusta à Musienene, Lubero, Nord-Kivu. Photo prise par E. SmithDumont

Il s’agit notamment de sélectionner diverses espèces d’arbres adaptées aux différents milieux et aux besoins spécifiques des agriculteurs eux-mêmes.

Relever les défis  de l’adoption

 Les participants ont convenu qu’alors que de significatifs progrès ont été accomplis dans la collecte d’informations sur les espèces natives prometteuses pour l’agroforesterie dans la région et dans l’élaboration d’outils pratiques, y compris un guide technique sur l’agroforesterie qui aide les gens à mettre en pratique les connaissances en agroforesterie,  il y a un besoin de changements politiques et pratiques pour l’expansion et le développement  de ce secteur dans la région.

Ils ont identifié sept problèmes majeurs qui doivent être abordés de manière intégrée: le genre, les marchés et la commercialisation, la gouvernance, la disponibilité et l’accès au matériel végétal de qualité, l’amélioration du savoir-faire agroforestier étant donné les de faibles taux d’alphabétisation, les menaces telles que les incendies et les ravageurs ainsi que les réalités culturelles.

Le genre et le droit foncier au premier plan
Deux questions – sur le droit foncier et sur le genre- ont été dégagées comme contraintes les plus impératives a résoudre. Sur la question du genre, Vea Kaghoma de la Ligue des Organisations des Femmes Paysannes en RDC a été catégorique et sans équivoque. Lors de la clôture de l’atelier, elle a déclaré que les femmes, qui constituent la majorité des agriculteurs et des commerçants, devraient être au cœur de tous les efforts de l’agroforesterie

Légende de la photo: Les petits exploitants femmes font le commerce sur le marché du soir à Kitchanga, Masisi, au Nord-Kivu, après une journée dans les champs. Beaucoup de membres de la communauté sont les déplacés internes dans leur propre pays et cultivent des terres marginales sans sécurité foncière. Photo prise par E Smith Dumont.

Légende de la photo: Les petits exploitants femmes font le commerce sur le marché du soir à Kitchanga, Masisi, au Nord-Kivu, après une journée dans les champs. Beaucoup de membres de la communauté sont les déplacés internes dans leur propre pays et cultivent des terres marginales sans sécurité foncière. Photo prise par E Smith Dumont.

au Nord-Kivu et que la participation des organisations de femmes est indispensable pour que ces efforts réussissent.

Emilie Smith Dumont de l’ICRAF en convient «Sans la sécurisation du foncier, en particulier pour les femmes, il est difficile de passer à l’étape suivante de l’intensification et pérennisation de l’agroforesterie en RDC», dit-elle. Les agriculteurs ne peuvent pas envisager de réaliser des investissements à long terme pour améliorer la santé des sols  ou planter des arbres s’ils n’ont pas d’accès à la sécurité foncière.

Communiquer le message

Dumont Smith se réjouit du dynamisme résultant des ateliers et du travail continu des participants pour mettre en pratique ce qu’ils ont appris au cours des trois dernières années. Wilson Kasereka Kabwana, président d’un groupe d’appui au Nord-Kivu (Programme d’Appui à la Consolidation de la Paix et du Développement ou PACOPAD), rapporte que son groupe a maintenant développé des pépinières pour multiplier plusieurs nouvelles espèces agroforestières. Ils travaillent en concert avec les communautés locales et les écoles pour sensibiliser les gens sur la valeur nutritionnelle,  médicinale et  environnementale des ces dernières.

Mone Van Geit, Chef de projet,  Programmes internationaux, WWF Belgique, affirme que l’idée est de poursuivre les partenariats solides qui ont été noués pendant le projet FCCC, avec des stratégies qui permettront au WWF de soutenir les communautés locales dans la diversification des espèces et des pratiques pour répondre à une gamme plus large des besoins des parties prenantes. Pour ce qui est des boisements-énergie, qui selon elle,

Légende de la photo: L'ONG locale PACOPAD collabore avec des écoles pour promouvoir la plantation de fruits de la passion et de tomates arbustives, en vue de cultiver des fruits riches en vitamines et d'améliorer la nutrition. Photo prise par Subira Bonhomme.

Légende de la photo: L’ONG locale PACOPAD collabore avec des écoles pour promouvoir la plantation de fruits de la passion et de tomates arbustives, en vue de cultiver des fruits riches en vitamines et d’améliorer la nutrition. Photo prise par Subira Bonhomme.

demeurent une priorité clé pour le WWF autour du parc, la diversification et l’inclusion des espèces indigènes seront prioritaires. Cela nécessitera des approches innovantes pour tester les mécanismes d’incitation et des essais pour sélectionner et évaluer ces espèces et leur mode de gestion.

Fergus Sinclair, qui dirige le domaine scientifique des Systèmes d’ICRAF, souligne qu’il espère que l’ICRAF, le WWF, leurs partenaires en RDC et de nouveaux acteurs intéressés par les droits fonciers, le genre et les marchés, pourront obtenir des soutiens pour la mise en œuvre de projets multidisciplinaires qui peuvent s’appuyer sur les fondations mise en place par le projet FCCC et servir de tramplin pour le développement de l’agroforesterie dans la région.

Selon les mots du ministre provincial, Christophe Ndibeshe Byemero, dans dix ans, si les partenaires continuent à travailler ensemble, le Nord Kivu pourrait devenir un véritable «modèle d’agroforesterie».
Pour plus d’informations sur ce travail, veuillez contacter Emilie Smith Dumont: e.smith@cgiar.org

 Lecture complémentaire

Rapport de l’atelier: http://www.worldagroforestry.org/output/north-kivu-report-workshop-drc

Plus de renseignements sur l’approche «recherche en développement» de l’ICRAF, consultez ces deux blogs: One small change of words – a giant leap in effectiveness! (Un petit changement de mots – un saut gigantesque dans l’efficacité!) Et For every tree a reason — research “in” rather than “for” agroforestry development (Pour chaque arbre une raison – recherche “dans” plutôt que “pour ” le développement agroforestier)

Pour en savoir plus sur le projet FCCC, consultez le blog: Outside a national park, agroforestry helping to save forests inside the park.(En dehors d’un parc national, l’agroforesterie aide à sauver les forêts à l’intérieur du parc.)

Pour en savoir plus sur le guide technique agroforestier développé pour le Nord-Kivu dans le cadre du projet de la FCCC: Beyond eucalyptus woodlots: what’s on the agroforestry menu for communities around Virunga? (Au-delà des boisés d’eucalyptus: qu’est-ce qui est sur le menu d’agroforesterie pour les communautés autour de Virunga?)

 Le guide technique (disponible uniquement en français) est disponible ici: Guide technique d’agroforesterie pour la selection de la gestion des arbres au Nord-Kivu

**Traduit par Ben Kibbyego**

 

 

Share

Joan Baxter

Joan Baxter is a communications specialist, journalist and award-winning author, with many years of experience in development and environmental research and writing in Africa and elsewhere.

You may also like...