Growing an agroforested future at Asia-Pacific Forestry Week

Agroforestry is of increasing importance within forestry realms. Trees on farms enhance forest functions, provide local livelihoods and support ecosystem services. The World Agroforestry Centre will be explaining more at the Week.

 

Agroforestry is bringing smiles to farmers' faces throughout Asia, as can be seen here, in Son La Province in Northwest Viet Nam. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

Agroforestry is bringing smiles to farmers’ faces throughout Asia, as can be seen here, in Son La Province in Northwest Viet Nam. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations is organizing the third Asia-Pacific Forestry Week, in Clark Freeport Zone, Philippines, 22–26 February 2016. Focused on sustainable forest management in Asia and the Pacific, it is one of the largest and most important forestry gatherings in the region. The 26th Session of the Asia-Pacific Forestry Commission will be held at the same time. The Republic of the Philippines’ Department of Environment and Natural Resources will co-host the event.

The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and partners will share knowledge about the many important functions that trees play outside of forests, looking towards an agroforested world of the future.

In Lao PDR, agroforests are bearing fruit for farmers near the nation's capital. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

In Lao PDR, agroforests are bearing fruit for farmers near the nation’s capital. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

The key session will be, The Importance of Agroforestry in Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), to be held in the Fontana Hotel, 11am–12:30pm, Wednesday, 24 February, as part of Stream 3, Serving Society: Forestry and People. The SDGs and their numerical targets don’t mention agroforestry or trees, and the word ‘forest’ appears only a few times; yet, land use with and without trees will have a major influence on the degree to which the goals can be achieved. The goals relate to the water–food–energy–income nexus of rural land use to those of equity and governance, and the planetary boundaries set by the agenda on biodiversity loss, climate change and healthy oceans and terrestrial systems. Panelists in this session will discuss the evidence for agroforestry as a key part of tropical land use supporting the SDG portfolio, and the opportunity brought by a more holistic land-use perspective afforded by agroforestry. The session will bring in experts in tropical land-use and agroforestry for an exciting and stimulating discussion on the evidence we have on how the 17 SDGs interact with agroforestry. To start the discussion, the SDGs will be combined with seven land-use-related groupings and the four ways agroforestry can help achieve the SDGs. Introduced by Dr Meine van Noordwijk, ICRAF’s chief science advisor, and moderated by Dr Delia Catacutan, ICRAF Viet Nam program coordinator, the panel features Mr Wiratno, ASEAN Social Forestry Network chairperson, Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Indonesia; Dr Rex Cruz, University of the Philippines, Los Baños; Ms Nguyen Tuong Van, VNForest, Viet Nam; Mr Henry Binahon, Binahon Agroforestry Enterprises; and Dr Tony Manila, GZZ/GAP-CC project, Philippines. The discussion will be summarized by Mr Dian Sukmajaya, ASEAN Economic Community Department, ASEAN Secretariat. The knowledge shared is linked with the ASEAN-Swiss Partnership on Social Forestry and Climate Change phase 2 project. For easy reference, download the Agroforestry and the SDGs session flyer

Landscapes that host multiple species and provide a range of functions have been proven to be more resilient to climate change while simultaneously boosting farmers' incomes. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

Landscapes that host multiple species and provide a range of functions have been proven to be more resilient to climate change while simultaneously boosting farmers’ incomes. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

Straight after this session, at 1:30–3pm in the Vegas 1 and 2 rooms of the Widus Hotel, Climate-smart Landscapes: Addressing Trade-offs and Delivering Multiple Benefits at Scale, will be presented by ICRAF and the Netherlands Development Organization (SNV). Planning and introducing solutions at the landscape level is critical to balance competing land-use goals and achieving synergies across multiple sectors, whilst mitigating and adapting to climate change. A ‘climate-smart landscape approach’ can help to address trade-offs and find common solutions across the land-use sectors of agriculture, forestry and energy, supporting food and nutrition security, ecosystem conservation and poverty alleviation. Intervening at this level offers a scale large enough to address many of the governance, market and policy failures that typically underlie the drivers of deforestation and ecosystem degradation, as well as marginalisation of the rural poor, particularly women. It also enables a deeper understanding of the impacts of climate change, as well as the necessary responses needed at multiples levels of intervention.

This session will explore some of the key ingredients and practical examples of using a climate-smart landscape approach. In particular, the need to 1) work with multiple stakeholders to develop and implement programmes and strategies for low-emission, climate-resilient landscape development; 2) integrate multiple benefits and address environmental and social safeguards in subnational planning processes; 3) involve a wide range of stakeholders, including business, in this process by facilitating inclusive public–private–producer partnerships; and 4) access innovative financing and engage with companies to unlock private investment. These four complementary areas of work need to be applied as a package in order to achieve long-lasting impacts at scale. Introduced by Dr Delia Catacutan, presenters include Dr Richard McNally, Dr Do Trong Hoan and Dr Richard Rastall.

ICRAF's team of global researchers work across disciplines and in forested and agroforested landscapes alongside partners in the FTA. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

ICRAF’s team of global researchers work across disciplines and in forested and agroforested landscapes alongside partners in the FTA. Photo: World Agroforestry Centre/Robert Finlayson

Three of the six partners in the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA)— ICRAF, Center for International Forestry Research and Bioversity International—are co-convening, The Research Agenda for Forested Landscapes, 2017–2022: Partnership Opportunities, 9–10:30am, Friday 26 February, Mahogany room, Holiday Inn. The event is linked to the stream, Our Green Future: Green Investment and Growing Our Natural Assets. Dr Meine van Noordwijk will discuss the FTA research program in the global development landscape, posing the ‘top 20 questions in forestry’. Dr Christopher Martius will focus on the FTA work program 2017–2020 and the options for engagement. Participants will be able to join groups during the session to discuss in more detail, ‘What are the research questions in forestry for the next six years?’, followed by a plenary and discussion on, ‘How can participants engage with the FTA program?’ You will also have the opportunity to give feedback to the proposal for the next phase of FTA research, which is more closely aligned with the SDGs, planned for the evening before, Thursday, 25 February, at 9pm. Email Meine van Noordwijk for details.

For more information, contact Robert Finlayson, regional communications specialist Southeast Asia: r.finlayson@cgiar.org.

 

 

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This work is linked to the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rob Finlayson

Rob Finlayson

Robert Finlayson is the Southeast Asia program's regional communications specialist and currently interim head of communications global. In his role as regional communications specialist, as well as writing stories for the Centre's website, he devises and supervises strategies for projects and the four countries in the Southeast Asia region, including scripting and producing videos, supervising editors and translators and also assisting with resource mobilization. As interim head of communications, Rob manages communications staff in Latin America, Africa and Asia and is overseeing implementation of ICRAF's Global Communications Group restructure.

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